Thailand car hire

  • "Everything was above expectations"
    by Kathrin Leukermoser
  • "The easiest way to rent a car"
    by L. Chadash
  • "Fantastic website"
    by Peter McComish
  • "Great experience"
    by Robert Knight
  • "A great way to rent a car"
    by Barend J de Beer

INTRODUCTION

Thailand is often the top of many travellers’ lists for exploring, thanks to the rich and varied culture found throughout the country. Modernity and tradition are mixed throughout the cities and towns, leaving many tourists feeling shocked at the stark differences between the bustling cities and the almost deserted islands.

The food is as far from European as possible, and makes for a great culinary adventure. Picturesque beaches can be found along almost all the coastline, with the option to scuba dive or simply relax available at every opportunity. Much of the architecture was built hundreds of years ago, and has been well-preserved, resulting in a rich tapestry of religious monuments open to explore.

Driving in Thailand
  • Road Driving Side
    L
  • Urban Speed Limit
    60kmh
  • Rural Speed Limit
    90kmh
  • Motorway Speed Limit
    120kmh

The driving culture in Thailand?

What are the roads like in Thailand?
In comparison to the neighbouring countries of Myanmar, Laos and Cambodia, the condition of the Thai roads is excellent, but there are areas of untreated roads and potholes that drivers should be wary of.
What are the drivers in Thailand like?
There appears to be a haphazard driving culture amongst the local Thai drivers, particularly in regards to drinking and driving, as well as speeding and dangerous overtaking. Motorbikes are also likely to be found driving close to the curb on the wrong side of the road.
What are the best times to drive?
It is advisable to completely avoid driving at night if possible as many local drivers either don’t have working headlights or choose not to use them; making driving incredibly dangerous on poorly lit roads.
What are the driving laws?
Visiting drivers are required to use both their home driving license as well as an international license. Seatbelts are required for those sat in the front seat of the car, as well as the driver.

Important things to note:

  • There is a large volume of small motorbikes on the roads at all times, potentially ridden by very young drivers (even as young as 12 years-old) making it vital to pay full attention to the road at all times.

    Whilst driving on motorways, large trucks may use indictors when not changing lanes. If a truck indicates left, it is a signal to say it is safe for the driver behind the truck to overtake. A right signal indicates that is it not safe.

    The ‘right of way’ is generally given to the larger vehicle, meaning buses and trucks are generally given right of way, rather than cars and motorbikes.

Attractions to drive to

Most popular destinations in Thailand