Oxford car hire

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    by Kathrin Leukermoser
  • "The easiest way to rent a car"
    by L. Chadash
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    by Peter McComish
  • "Great experience"
    by Robert Knight
  • "A great way to rent a car"
    by Barend J de Beer

Introduction

The oldest university city in the UK, Oxford has a rich and compelling history which can be seen threaded throughout the area in the buildings and institutions open to explore. The museums in the city are of a world-class quality while there are limitless cultural events and areas to explore.
The history of the city dates back to the Saxon period and this deep history serves to make Oxford a very compelling place to visit. The food establishments are also second to none, with world-class chefs establishing restaurants in the city centre.

Ideal car

Economy
Due to the narrow streets and heavy traffic, a small city car will handle the roads perfectly, especially as the roads themselves are generally of an excellent condition.

Driving in Oxford
  • Road Driving Side
    L
  • Urban Speed Limit
    30mph
  • Rural Speed Limit
    60mph
  • Motorway Speed Limit
    70mph

Highlights & Hotspots

Opened in 1602, Bodleian Library is amongst the oldest in the continent and its contents are second only to the British Library in London. Book, history and culture lovers will be enthralled both by the building itself and its contents.
The Ashmolean Museum perfectly finds the balance between modern and old as the museum itself was first opened in 1683 and as such is the oldest museum in the country. The building has recently undergone massive modernisation and as such the experience is astounding as Western and Eastern art and artefacts are displayed within.
No trip to Oxford is complete without punting, especially in the summer time. Whether you guide yourself or take one of the excellent tours hosted by the city’s students, the wooden boat travelling along the river allows views to the city that are inaccessible by any other means.
The University Boat Races that take place twice annually are a globally celebrated event as the Oxford tradition of rowing unites the country as an event. The days themselves are often full of cheer as friends gather to drink and support their team mates.

Important things to note

The centre of the city runs on a one-way system which can occasionally be confusing to those visiting the area for the first time. It is highly recommended that visitors invest in either a modern map or GPS to navigate the streets.
The streets remain almost untouched from their original building meaning that they can often be very narrow and difficult to navigate.
The traffic within the centre of the city can be very heavy, especially midweek. It is advised drivers avoid rush hour times which take place 7.30-9.30am and 4.30-6.30pm.

Attractions to drive to

Airport Information

While Oxford has its own airport, it is only used for private aircraft and charter flights. Those travelling to Oxford by plane will generally land in Heathrow or Gatwick in neighbouring London which are both massive and incredibly busy international airports.
Oxford Airport is just over three miles north of the city centre. It’s connected by road to the A44, which then becomes the A144 as you drive into the city itself.