Trieste car hire

  • "Everything was above expectations"
    by Kathrin Leukermoser
  • "The easiest way to rent a car"
    by L. Chadash
  • "Fantastic website"
    by Peter McComish
  • "Great experience"
    by Robert Knight
  • "A great way to rent a car"
    by Barend J de Beer

Introduction

Located in the north-eastern corner of Italy near the border with Croatia, Trieste is a city steeped in history. Formerly part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire, it’s a place where Italian, Slavic and German cultures fuse together to form something substantial. Despite its historical importance, it doesn’t enjoy the same lofty reputation with tourists that neighbouring Venice does.
Nevertheless, Trieste is a great place to visit. You’re on the coast where the Adriatic and Mediterranean Seas meet, you’re never too far away from the borders with Croatia, Slovenia and Austria and there’s also a great choice of places to while away a lazy summer evening such as restaurants, bars and theatres.

Ideal car

Economy
Some of the roads around Trieste have some sharp corners. For turning, a small car is the best option, while they’re also handier for street parking if you need to pick something up.

  • avis
  • budget
  • alamo
  • enterprise
  • europcar
  • national
  • thrifty
  • hertz
Driving in Trieste
  • Road Driving Side
    R
  • Urban Speed Limit
    50kmh
  • Rural Speed Limit
    90kmh
  • Motorway Speed Limit
    110kmh

Highlights & Hotspots

Citta Vecchia, translated as Old Town, is one of the most popular parts of Trieste with visitors. Either side of the narrow and crooked streets, you’re highly likely to find many medieval houses as well as a few shops and restaurants away from the busy part of town.
The Museo Revoltella is one of a handful of museums in the city. Its roots go back to the mid-19th century when it was donated to Trieste by Baron Pasquale Revoltella, who helped to fund many an aspiring artist. Today, modern and contemporary artworks are on display here.
The Roman Theatre, built during the rule of Emperor Octavius in 33BC, is still partly intact. Near the bottom of San Giusto Hill, it’s a good place to explore if you want to get out in the open air while learning about Trieste from centuries ago.
The Arco di Riccardo, an Augustan gate constructed as part of the city’s Roman walls, is the main gateway to the Citta Vecchia. It’s one of the first things you should get out and see if you have a camera handy.

Important things to note

The area around the port can be a traffic hotspot, especially when cruise ships dock here. Be sure to drive around there at night when it’s quieter.
There are a few road tunnels going around Trieste, two of which cross the border with Slovenia. They can be hard to pass through in the event of heavy snowfall.
Some local traffic is taken up with buses, which can be frequent during the daytime. They generally have right of way here.

Attractions to drive to

Airport Information

Trieste – Friuli Venezia Giulia Airport is 12 miles northwest of Trieste. It has a solitary passenger terminal, while planes regularly travel to other parts of Italy as well as major European cities including London, Birmingham, Munich and Valencia.
The airport is on the SS14, which goes southwest through Montalcone onto the A4. Alternatively, staying on the SS14 will take you directly towards Trieste’s city centre.