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Turin

Introduction

The jewel in the crown of Piedmont, Turin is a city which comes across as a little more traditional than others in Italy such as, say, Florence or Rome. Home of the Italian Royal Family, Turin retains much of its aristocratic, old-world air today, while the leafy boulevards and peaceful parks have managed to gain the interest of tourists looking for something different. Aside from being home to many cultural, historical and natural attractions, Turin has a reputation as one of the foremost cities in the world for motoring. Fiat has their main factory here and therefore has a big impact on daily life – they own a large share in Juventus, the city’s biggest football club. Anyone coming to Turin is sure to find something they’ll enjoy.

Ideal car

Family
As Turin has a great road network, a family car, even a saloon, will work no matter where you’re driving, especially as the city has plenty of motorways.

Driving in Turin

R

Road Driving Side

50kmh

Urban Speed Limit

90kmh

Rural Speed Limit

130kmh

Motorway Speed Limit

Important things to note

Many of the main toll motorways going into and out of Turin are toll roads. For that reason, it’s important to have some loose change with you while driving.
When one of the city’s two main football teams is playing, traffic can be a problem around both stadia. Avoid if you don’t plan on going by car.
Some of the toll roads leading into Turin can be hard to get onto during public holidays. Check your calendar before travelling to the city.

Highlights & Hotspots

Turin’s most famous sight is the Shroud of Turin, which is located in the Cathedral of St John the Baptist. Stored in a vault below the Duomo, it’s only seen whenever the Pope gives his permission for it to be displayed in public. If not on show, the cathedral itself is worth exploring.
The Museo dell’Automobile pays homage to Turin’s rich history as a motoring hub. At the museum on Corso Unita d’Italia 40, there are over 170 different vehicles on display here including cars that have been used for Formula 1.
If you like football, then you’ll love to see Juventus at Juventus Stadium. The current champions of Italy, they’re among the world’s most famous club sides. Local rivals Torino play at the city’s Olympic Stadium and enjoy a fierce rivalry with ‘Juve’.
Film fans will love to visit the National Cinema Museum in the centre of Turin. Across the building’s five floors, you’ll find old film reels, classic posters and exhibitions dedicated to stars of the silver screen, genres and iconic films throughout the years.

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Airport Information

Turin Airport is roughly nine miles north-northwest of Turin. It serves over 3.5 million passengers a year, offering flights to destinations throughout Europe, Asia and North Africa. The airport currently has one main terminal building.
The airport can be reached by road via the A4 Autostrade, which is just south of the airport itself, the A4 will take you towards central Turin, as well as some of the northern and eastern suburbs.